SWIMMING POOL WATER - THE ESSENTIAL GUIDE

PWTAG Conference 2019

The PWTAG Conference features a range of vital, ground-breaking presentations and is a must-see for professionals in the pool water industry.

Don’t miss the premiere conference for the UK pool water industry!

Following on from last year’s sell-out success, the 2019 event – taking place on Wednesday 13 November at Holywell Conference Centre in Loughborough – promises to be bigger and bolder.

As well as important updates on PWTAG’s PoolMark scheme for validating pools, there will be presentations and insights from experts in their field and trade stands from aquatics businesses.

Operators and businesses can also download a PWTAG Conference 2019 Flyer (pdf) to share with partners or submit via email.

Join Us at the PWTAG Conference 2019

Ticket sales have now closed for this year’s Conference – if you did not manage to buy a ticket, please contact us ASAP on admin@pwtag.org.

Who is presenting at the PWTAG Conference 2019?

Click or tap the name of the presentation below to find out more.

SpeakerPresentation
Janice Calvert, PWTAG ChairPWTAG; the state of the nation annual address and PWTAG and Swim England – a partnership for people swimming
Dr Rachel Chalmers, NHS National Reference CentreValidation and application of Cryptosporidium assays for swimming pool waters and filter backwash
Martin Wood, Pool SentryRole of filtration in managing the risk from Cryptosporidium in commercial swimming pools
Cristiana VillanuevaTHMs in pools a cause for concern due to disinfection by-product exposure and health risks among swimmers
Emma Pussin, author of the Lido GuideLidos – the future
Robin Mitchell, PALM Academy and Pioneering Pool SolutionsPoolMark – Professional Assessment – stepping up to the Mark
Richy Mariner, Science Manager European Chemical Industry CouncilBiocides and swimming pools – the impact of the regulation
Janice Calvert, PWTAG ChairChlorine oxidisation the secret to healthy, clear, sparkling water
Chris Hebblewhite, GLL and WG8 Swimming Pool StandardsDrowning detection systems in pools – time for a clear perspective

PWTAG; the state of the nation annual address and PWTAG and Swim England – a partnership for people swimming

There will be an update on PWTAG’s work and focus of 2019 including the move to Swim England at Loughborough University. A closer partnership with swimmers and aquatic activity heralds a more intense focus on ensuring healthy and attractive swimming conditions. PWTAG’s work has also expanded to take into account water based activities such as hot tubs and spa pools.

Validation and application of Cryptosporidium assays for swimming pool waters and filter backwash

How well are we doing in the UK in the fight against probably the greatest threat that has faced swimming pool operation for many years? Rachel will inform us of the national picture, including testing and investigation procedures which will highlight how UK pools need to do better. Additional information will be provided on the need for clarification regarding interpretation to inform public health actions.

Role of filtration in managing the risk from Cryptosporidium in commercial swimming pools

This review, one of the most significant and far reaching studies in the effectiveness of pool filtration, explains the mechanisms by which filters remove particles of different sizes, factors that affect the efficiency of particle removal (such as filtration velocity), current recommended management practices, and identifies further work to support the development of a risk-based management approach for the management of waterborne disease outbreaks from swimming pools. The findings go to the heart of swimming pool operation.

THMs in pools a cause for concern due to disinfection by-product exposure and health risks among swimmers

Swimming is generally considered to be a health-enhancing activity. However, after water leaves a public water system and enters a pool, its quality is managed at the most local level in the UK by pool managers or lifeguards. Studies have provided the clearest evidence to date that disinfected water might be genotoxic and carcinogenic to humans, and that genotype may be a critical factor in susceptibility to bladder cancer in individuals exposed to DBPs. A source reduction approach is challenging for swimming pools, because the swimmers themselves are the largest source of nitrogenous substrates and a substantial source of organic matter necessary for DBP formation. How do we who operate and control pools, balancing this threat against the good that pools do in the health of the nation?

Lidos – the future

The golden age of lidos in the UK was in the 1930s, when outdoor swimming became popular, and 169 were built across the UK as recreational facilities by local councils. Many have since closed, a significant loss to our health and welfare infrastructure. Today, lidos and outdoor pools are enjoying a renaissance with an increasing number are being rescued, with additional active campaigns to rescue even more. Emma and Janet Wilkinson have written a guide to many of our lidos hoping to inspire people to visit, and enable them to plan those visits. We will look also at the challenges some lidos face in terms of maintaining basic water quality but how many are embracing new technology in filtration, disinfection and heating systems creating sustainable solutions for tomorrow.

PoolMark – professional assessment – stepping up to the Mark

The take up of pools prepared to go through the Poolmark assessment process has been abysmal. However, showing your pool is up to the mark is probably one of the most customer orientated decisions an operator can take, exercising confidence in a pool and giving customers assurance not provided in any other way. PWTAG have now come up with a new way to access PoolMark that is both cost effective and less administratively demanding and Robin Mitchell will explain this is more detail.

Biocides and swimming pools – the impact of the regulation

All biocidal products to be placed on the market require an authorisation, and authorisation cannot be obtained until the active substances contained in that biocidal product have been approved. In the past swimming pools have been subjected to many weird and wonderful biocides, some of which worked whilst others were positively dangerous. What impact are these regulations to have on swimming pool operation? It’s the suppliers that must comply but it’s up to the purchaser – the pool operator – to understand the profound changes that are now taking place in the chemical market place.

Chlorine oxidisation the secret to healthy, clear, sparkling water

Free chlorine does more than disinfect it also oxidises. The experienced operator knows that the surest way to achieve crystal clear water with a blueish hue is through free residual chlorination, because of the ability of free chlorine to react quickly with organic matter, bleaching it. This ultimate clarity or polished appearance is from the free available chlorine and not from filtration. A pool that is filtered but not chlorinated will soon take on a dull cast, which will gradually increase until the water becomes opaque. Then the water will turn a pea green, making it an unfit environment for bathers. The filtration system cannot be substituted for chlorine oxidation. We will discuss and elaborate upon this theme.

Drowning detection systems in pools – time for a clear perspective

There is a standard ISO 20380:2017– Computer vision systems for the detection of drowning accidents in swimming pools. Here in the UK the standards working group WG8 believe ISO 20380 is restrictive and inappropriate in the majority of swimming pool situations. We are instead proposing a wider scope for the existing standard to make it more adaptable or to develop our own BSI standard for all UK drowning detection devices and not just those based upon computer vision. Drowning detection devices are set to have a major impact on safety in swimming pools. The proposals will go to the ISO European development group shortly and this paper will identify the reasons for change and outline the UK standard.

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